Authors

Lilian W.Y. CheungLilian W.Y. Cheung, DSc, is lecturer and director of health promotion and communication in the department of nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and has been a co-investigator at the Harvard Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity. She was the co-principal investigator for the original Eat Well & Keep Moving controlled trial in Baltimore Public Schools, the curriculum of which became the foundation for the first edition of this book. Her work focuses on the translation of science-based recommendations into public health communications and programs to promote healthy lifestyles for prevention and control of chronic disease.

Dr. Cheung co-developed three websites at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: The Nutrition Source, The Obesity Prevention Source, and the Asian Diabetes Prevention Initiative. She co-edited Child Health, Nutrition and Physical Activity (1995) with the late Surgeon General Dr. Julius Richmond and co-authored Be Healthy! It’s A Girl Thing: Food, Fitness and Feeling Great! (2003, 2010), a book for adolescent girls. Her latest book, Savor: Mindful Eating, Mindful Life, is co-authored with Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh (2010, 2011) and has been translated into 17 countries. In her leisure time she enjoys gardening, yoga, cooking, meditation, and chi gong.

Hank Dart, MS,Hank Dart, MS, is a health communications consultant who works in prevention and control for the Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine. He has worked for more than two decades in health communication and health education both on the federal level and in academia. He managed the education component of the Eat Well & Keep Moving study, and he developed all the educational materials for the program. He also managed the development of the popular health risk assessment website Your Disease Risk, and he coauthored the book Healthy Women, Healthy Lives. In his spare time, he enjoys trail running, Nordic skiing, and writing mediocre poetry.

Sari Kalin, MS, RD, LDNSari Kalin, MS, RD, LDN, is a registered dietitian with more than a decade of experience in health promotion and communication. She has been a wellness consultant with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Massachusetts, where she partnered with employers to design and deliver workplace wellness initiatives to engage employees and drive behavior change. Previously she was director of obesity prevention and wellness programs at South End Community Health Center; before that, she was program coordinator at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where she managed The Nutrition Source website. In her spare time she enjoys fitness walking, cooking healthy foods, and playing jazz piano and accordion.

Brett Otis, BSBrett Otis, BS, is an editorial and communications associate in the department of nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and at the Harvard Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity, where he lends strategic support to multiple websites, publications, and communications initiatives. Merging his background in journalism, media relations, and health communications, he is interested in the translation and visualization of research through multiplatform and multimedia channels to address public health and environmental issues. In his spare time he enjoys running, road cycling, exploring farmers’ markets, cooking, and photography.

Steven L. Gortmaker, PhDSteven L. Gortmaker, PhD, is a professor of health sociology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where he has been a faculty member since 1978. He directs the Harvard Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity, whose mission is to design, implement, and evaluate programs that improve physical activity and nutrition; reduce overweight; and decrease risk of chronic disease among children. He was the co-principal investigator for the original Eat Well & Keep Moving controlled trial in Baltimore Public Schools, and he has more than 180 research publications to his credit. Through a randomized controlled trial, he helped develop Planet Health, the first middle school curriculum that proved to reduce the prevalence of obesity among girls through improvements in diet, increased physical activity, and reduced television viewing. He enjoys playing sports with his family, golfing, playing tennis, hiking, and reading.